Increase Vertical Jump without Weights

How to Increase Vertical Jump without Weights (Old Man Guide to Jumping Higher)

Are you looking for ways to increase vertical jump but don’t want to use weights? Here’s a method that suits your needs (and it’s super easy to do).

If you’ve read “how to play the old man game” on this blog, you know explosiveness and athleticism aren’t part of the core tenets.

But being able to jump higher is useful in basketball.

You can do more things if you increase your vertical jump. You can grab rebounds better, you can contest shots better, and you can go for layups more effectively (and maybe… just maybe, you can go up for a dunk).

Now, there are many different ways to increase vertical jump. You can do power training, Olympic training, and plyometric training.

And these methods are effective. But these methods don’t fit the old man game principles. So, I’m going to share with you a different technique you can use to jump higher for basketball.

And that technique is with stretching.

Why I Prefer To Increase Vertical Jump Without Weights

flexible sportsman stretching on sports ground
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

When I was younger, I loved working on my explosion (my ability to jump higher, not making explosives or farting deafeningly. Just wanted to clear that up). It felt great to be able to attack the basket and lay the ball on someone and to be able to jump up and deny a shot (I grew up during the Vince Carter, Kobe Bryant, and the Tracy McGrady days).

Needless to say, I focused a lot on trying to increase my vertical. I spent a bunch of time doing plyometric exercises and copying workouts that I saw in Dragon Ball Z.

After a few months, my vertical jump did increase a bit as a result (and I can thank anime for that). So, I continued to use these methods and play this style.

But as I got older, I noticed my body ached after playing basketball or doing plyometrics. My legs and lower back would be sore for days, too.

And the reason why was because I was jumping around too much. And also because my body aged. But mainly because I was jumping around while doing plyometric exercises and also while I was playing basketball.

My body couldn’t take all that pounding and impact.

Luckily for me, I found a new method of working on my vertical –a method that wasn’t just easier on my body but also fixed it.

The Stretches That Increase Your Jumping

So, here are the stretches you can do to increase vertical jump:

  • Mackenzie Press-up
  • Calf Stretch
  • Hip Flexor Lunge Stretch

When doing these stretches, you should hold each for 20-30 seconds and do 2-3 sets. Also, and this is obvious, but remember to stretch both sides.

How Can Stretching Increase Vertical Jump?

According to experts, jumping is a three-extension movement. So if you decrease resistance and increase your range of motion, you can extend longer when you jump. You may not get more lift or airtime by doing this, but you’ll definitely be able to reach higher.

These stretches can also increase your sprinting speed, which is a good exercise for increasing lower-body strength and cardio.

Additionally, by doing these three stretches, not only will you loosen up your muscles, priming them to jump higher, but you’ll also fix your posture. This will prevent injuries (and, more importantly, it’ll feel nice).

Exercises You Can Do To Jump Higher

In addition to these stretches, you should also do some light bodyweight exercises. These will maximize your jumping potential (Old Man Game way) and condition your legs for basketball.

The movements are:

  • Broad Jump
  • Squats
  • Lunges
  • Calf Raises

You should do these after the stretches. As for sets and reps, try to go for 3 sets of 8-10 reps, once or twice a week.

Do these exercises with max effort, but start off slow at the beginning.

READ MORE: The Steve Nash Home Bodyweight Workout

These stretches and exercises aren’t anything extremely strenuous. But if you do them correctly, consistently, and mindfully, you can leap higher. And you’ll be doing it the old man way.